How To Enjoy Music More

Music, to some degree, is a language that is universal.  A music and songs can bring us to tears, make us want to move our bodies and dance, and make us reminisce long-lost memories. Whether you listen to music occasionally or frequently, aside from taking your favorite bottle of wine from your wine cooler cabinet to drink and relax, there are a few other ways you could do to enjoy music more.

Ways To Enjoy Music More

Repeatedly Listen To It

If you’re genuinely interested in intensifying your admiration for music, don’t allot much substance to your first impressions of a music or song. Studies show that we are inclined to find new effects objectionable at first, nonetheless over time and  through constant exposure, we grow fond of them. This is termed as the mere-exposure effect.

“The brain is a pattern-seeking organ, so it looks for patterns in music to make sense of what we hear.”  – Philip Ball, author of The Music Instinct

“Familiarity with worthwhile music steadily increases one’s enjoyment in it. New beauties are ever being revealed from time to time, and more and more pleasure comes from fuller appreciation and understanding. One never tires of good music.” – Maud Powell, 1917

As Much as Possible, Listen to as Several Genres of Music

On the contrary, listening to unfamiliar music also does something good for your brain. Researchers in Canada confirmed that listening to music or tunes that are new to your ears stimulates the reward center of the brain, which bring about the discharge of dopamine, a chemical also connected to “feel-good” actions. Therefore when it comes to tunes or music, do some discovery and recompense your brain.

Individually Listen To Each Track

Another great approach to understand and appreciate the song or tune is to listen to every single track separately. Musicians can naturally do this.

“A musician will be listening to the sound of his own instrument even though many other instruments are playing.” Nina Kraus, Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory director at Northwestern University

Instead of Choosing a Song, Choose an Experience

When looking for the proper tune or music, Tyler Gray, co-author of the book The Sonic Boom: How Sound Transforms the Way We Think, Feel and Buy, recommends searching further than the artist and title.

“Instead of trying to think about what song you’d like to listen to, start by thinking about what kind of music best suits your situation. We live in a pretty magical time when you can pretty much instantly access—through Spotify or Songza or iTunes—whatever music you want to hear. What’s the perfect music for your commute, your road trip, your work day, your date? Start there, and you’ll set yourself up for a better experience.” – Tyler Gray

 

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